Archive for the ‘Poverty’ Category

Fiona Bruce narrates our new film

Fiona Bruce narrates our new film

Britain's well known BBC newsreader and presenter Fiona Bruce is the voice-over for our latest film, "Independence, not Dependence". The video gives an introduction to who we are, what we do and why we do it. We believe in creating the conditions to allow people to become empowered and independent in their way out of poverty, not becoming dependent upon foreign aid. Find out more by watching the film below.

Over 14,000 manual scavengers rehabilitated

March 04, 2011  |   General news,Poverty,Sanitation   |

Over 14,000 manual scavengers rehabilitated

"The Orissa Government has claimed to have rehabilitated 14,077 persons involved in manual scavenging in the State. In a report recently submitted to the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), the State government mentioned that about 3,456 manual scavengers could not be rehabilitated due to their death and migration and many were not interested in receiving the benefits. According to the last survey, as many as 16,386 manual scavengers and their dependants were identified for rehabilitation and subsequently 1,147 were identified which took the total number of manual scavengers in the State to 17,533. The State government claimed that the number of scavengers in Orissa came down from 35,049 in 1997-98 to 17,533 in 2008..." Read the full article: http://www.hindu.com/2011/02/01/stories/2011020157200300.htm

India, Bihar: ‘Dirty, horrible job’ of manual scavengers

November 30, 2010  |   Empowerment,Environment,General news,Poverty,Sanitation   |

India, Bihar: ‘Dirty, horrible job’ of manual scavengers

A manual scavenger carries a tin of human waste from a dry latrine. Photo: BBC “The worst thing is that the baskets we carry the waste in, often leak and drips down over your clothes”, manual scavenger Lakshmi Devi from rural Bihar tells BBC correspondent Mike Thomson. All her seven children are boys who clean out sewage tanks for their work. Manual removal of excreta (night soil) from “dry toilets” is the job of ‘dalit’ (low caste) women in India. “If I had a daughter I would rather that we all die of hunger than allow her to do the work we do”, Lakshmi said. Listen to Laksmi Devi’s interview (10 Nov 2010), which was broadcast on BBC Radio 4, and read a background article (17 Nov 2010) by Mike Thomson on scavengers from the serie on “India’s forgotten people”.

India: “We need a sanitation revolution”

November 28, 2010  |   Environment,General news,Poverty,Sanitation   |

India: “We need a sanitation revolution”

India: ‘We need a sanitation revolution here’, says adviser to Urban Affairs minister Speaking at a workshop on the ‘City Sanitation Plan’ in Bangalore, the Adviser to Karnataka state Chief Minister on Urban Affairs A. Ravindra said: “We need a sanitation revolution in the country. There is a need to create public awareness and use innovative and low-cost technologies for better sanitation”. Adding to this, at the inauguration if the workshop, the Karnataka state Minister for Urban Development S. Suresh Kumar stated: “It is unfortunate that we have not made sanitation our priority. This is evident as according to a recent report, there are more mobile users than toilet users in the country. Sanitation does not only mean using toilets; it also includes efficient solid waste management, underground drainage network, and keeping our cities and towns clean”. Karnataka is looking to rank first in the second round of the National City Rating under the National Urban Sanitation Policy to be announced on 8 December 2010. In the first round in May 2010, Mysore secured the second place, while the eighth, 12th, 15th and 22nd positions went to Bangalore, Mangalore, Mandya and Bidar respectively. “We must strive to secure the first position next year. We must work ...

World Toilet Day, November 19th

World Toilet Day, November 19th

November 19th is World Toilet Day. Join the Big Squat! A day to celebrate the importance of sanitation and raise awareness for the 2.6 billion people (nearly half of the world's population) who don't have access to toilets and proper sanitation. Where there are no toilets: 2.6 billion people worldwide are without access to proper sanitation, which risks their health, strips their dignity, and kills 1.8 million people, mostly children, a year. Diarrhoeal diseases kill five times as many children in the developing world as HIV/AIDS. That's 5,000 children DYING EVERY SINGLE DAY. Not only that, but the disease kills more children than either malaria or AIDS, stunts growth, and forces millions - adults and children alike - to spend weeks at a time off work or school, which hits both a country's economy and its citizens' chances of a better future. The majority of the illness in the world is caused by faecal matter. Lack of sanitation is the world's biggest cause of infection. One gram of faeces can contain 10 million viruses, one million bacteria, 1,000 parasite cysts and 100 parasite eggs. Safe disposal of children's faeces leads to a reduction of nearly 40% in childhood diarrhoea. Wherever the ...

Haiti: hygiene promotion is key

November 17, 2010  |   Environment,General news,Poverty,Sanitation,Water   |

Haiti: hygiene promotion is key

Haiti: hygiene promotion is key to preventing nationwide cholera epidemic, says Save the Children as death toll passes 900 As the death toll from Haiti’s cholera epidemic reached 917 on 12 November 2010, Save the Children says the best way to reduce the disease’s spread is to arm people with information and supplies to improve hygienic practices. Cholera has reached the capital Port-au-Prince, where 27 deaths have been recorded and over 1.3 million earthquake survivors living in tent camps are at risk. Throughout the country 14,600 cholera victims have been hospitalised. The United Nations forecasts up to 200,000 Haitians could contract cholera as the outbreak extends across the country of nearly 10 million, and says $163.9 million in aid is needed over the next year to combat the epidemic. In Gaston Margron, a camp where Save the Children works, the first suspected case of cholera has been identified. With a large number of deaths happening in the community, Save the Children fears that people may not be able to access health facilities when illness strikes. Also of concern is that people may not recognize the importance of seeking heath care immediately when they have any signs of symptoms – namely, acute watery diarrhea. Nick Ireland, ...

The good news of the decade?

October 11, 2010  |   General news,Poverty   |

The good news of the decade?

Hans Rosling reframes 10 years of UN data with his unique visuals, proposing a fascinating theory: We're winning the war against child mortality.

Guardian podcast on the MDGs

October 07, 2010  |   General news,Poverty   |

Guardian podcast on the MDGs

In the wake of the UN millennium development goals summit, the Guardian looks at the challenge of meeting the needs of the world's poorest and ask what should happen to global development after 2015. Listen to the podcast here

The urban disaster

September 30, 2010  |   Environment,General news,Poverty,Sanitation,Water   |

The urban disaster

For the first time in the history of mankind, more people live in an urban environment than a rural one and in just 20 years, over 60 per cent of the world’s population will live in cities and towns. This Red Cross World Disasters Report 2010 focuses on urban risks around the world: Chapter 5 - urban risk to health (PDF 421kb) Find the full report here: www.ifrc.org/publicat/wdr2010/summaries.asp

Which bottom billion?

September 27, 2010  |   General news,Poverty   |

Which bottom billion?

Approximately three quarters of the world's 1.3 billion poor people today live in middle-income countries, with the others living in low-income countries, mostly in Africa. See the interactive data here: http://gu.com/p/2jkxe